Summer Lightning

June workshops
June Calendar

This Memorial Day weekend has brought sunny hot days that end in evening thunderstorms. The flashes of lightning outside remind me to share the playlist of 16 videos from our April Lightning Round. The short clips are perfect for a tweet-out. Thanks to Chris Vandegrift for amazing video work!

Two June workshops build on Lightning Round energy. Ben Wiggins joins our intern Chava Spivak-Birndorf, creator of WIC and Dogs Timelines, for a TimelineJS workshop on June 8 and Ian Petrie presents a Scalar workshop on June 15. June has more fun topics as well, including how to get Google to notice your website.

Changes in Lynda.com Licensing

lyndaSimpleWhether you’re brushing up an existing skill, learning a new one, or exploring what’s up and coming, Lynda.com is a good starting point and a useful tool for professional development. They offer hundreds of brief courses designed for all learning levels. Content is often presented in 3 to 5 minute segments. Playlists make it easy to manage and customize your experience, and learn at the pace and schedule best suited to your needs. Bookmarks allow easy reference to favorite course sections and the service adds new videos weekly.

The Good News: Through a new, expanded agreement with Lynda.com, Penn full-time and part-time faculty and staff can now view instructional videos on a wide range of software products, technologies, and business topics. The service is conveniently available 24/7, via your desktop computer or mobile device. Just go to http://lynda.upenn.edu and login with your PennKey and password.

The Bad News: As of June 1, 2016, Penn Libraries are no longer able to make Lynda.com licenses available to Penn Students because of a change in Lynda.com’s terms of service. We are very sorry to be discontinuing this popular service, and we apologize for the inconvenience.

If you are a student whose school/department does not pay for you to have access to Lynda, you can explore Lynda.com through a free 10-day trial or inexpensive personal membership options at http://www.lynda.com

Please feel free to send your comments and suggestions to us at wic1@pobox.upenn.edu

Managing Social Media at the Commons


michelle joMichelle Bookyung Jo is a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences studying communication. In this post, she shares her experiences working at Weigle Information Commons as a Social Media Manager and discusses our strategies for actively engaging the Penn community.

I have always known that Weigle Information Commons has a lot going on, on top of the study booths and group study rooms students reserve throughout the semester. Working as a social media student worker at WIC for the past academic year, I not only learned more about what WIC is but also gained important hands-on experiences managing social media accounts to connect with WIC’s audience.

WIC has various online channels through which it reaches the Penn community. It has its own Twitter and Instagram account and also contributes to the Penn Libraries social media channels: @upennlib on Twitter, InstagramFacebook; pennlibraries on Youtube; and University of Pennsylvania Libraries on Flickr. Focusing on Twitter and Instagram, I got to see who WIC connects with and what WIC is for the Penn community.

My most basic job responsibility was scheduling tweets for WIC’s weekly workshops, but I explored more ways to leverage social media channels and use Twitter as a way to promote WIC as a resource for everyone. Some weeks I focused on updating the audience about various types of digital support WIC offers including digital device rentals. Some other weeks, I focused on major upcoming events in WIC such as the Engaging Students through Technology Symposium and Diversi-Tea sessions. More importantly, trying to see WIC’s social media presence from an undergraduate student’s perspective, I tried to make the social media channels as current as possible, posting pictures of workshops and any ongoing events at WIC.

The most challenging part of my job was to make sure that our content reaches not just Penn faculty but Penn students as well. We understand that following many subsidiary accounts within the University may not be as appealing as following the main “uofpenn” account, but I still wanted to make sure that there will be content for students should they find us interesting and look for more. Such an effort was mostly made on WIC’s Instagram account, and it has been a channel where I post more up-to-date content about WIC.

As an undergraduate student worker, I realized that there is a lot going on at WIC. I would like to invite fellow undergraduate students to know that any digital or technology-related support is available at WIC and encourage everyone to check our blog and social media channels from time to time.

Wall of Rejection @ WIC

Image of one of rejections that was posted to the wall. It says, "I am not my rejections and lists several clubs and internships from which the student was rejected.

Oh, rejection… We’ve all been there. From the minor everyday letdowns of our social media posts remaining unliked to the major devastations of not getting into our preferred school, rejection is a very real component of the student experience.

In his TED Talk on emotional pain, psychologist Guy Winch refers to rejection as a “psychological wound,” and it really does feel this way sometimes. Winch writes, “Rejection destabilizes our need to belong, leaving us feeling unsettled and socially untethered.” Yes, it’s normal and happens to everyone, but in that moment, it can be difficult to keep things in perspective. We have a tendency to withdraw to protect ourselves.

One imagines these feelings of isolation and disappointment that we experience through rejection are only amplified in a highly competitive academic environment such as Penn’s. Regarding the complex issues relating to campus student culture and mental health, college junior Rebecca Brown wrote an op-ed piece for the The Daily Pennsylvanian. Brown writes,

In internships, in graduate school admissions and especially in student activities. We slap on the Penn Face and pretend rejection doesn’t happen, or at least it doesn’t happen to us.

She calls for an increased culture of openness at Penn in which to discuss and destigmatize rejection. To help facilitate this process, she and other fellow student leaders recently created Penn’s first Wall of Rejection.

Image of the wall of rejection.

The student-managed exhibit sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs was hosted by WIC and students contributed items from April 25th to the 29th. The Weingarten Learning Resources Center (VPUL) is a partner in the soon-to-be-launched PennFaces website that will feature interviews with the Penn Wall student organizers. The entire Penn community was encouraged to come and share their rejection stories on the wall by filling out a notecard and having a polaroid photo taken.

image of a student's photo being taken for the wall

This patchwork of rejection tales coalesce into an inspiring narrative of camaraderie and support. Brown writes, “To make rejection a more acceptable topic at Penn is no easy task. Naturally, there is a sense of embarrassment that accompanies rejection. But thinking of rejection as a shared experience helps.”

Penn Benjamin’s Peer Counseling also shares this attitude and provides undergraduate students with in-person peer counseling as part of WIC’s Student Assistance Services.

The Penn Wall of Rejection is in good company. A few weeks ago, Princeton professor Johannes Haushofer’s CV of failures made headlines.

Well-known author J.K. Rowling also recently shared two of her rejection letters on Twitter to inspire future writers.

The Wall of Rejection is on display at WIC until commencement, and many members of the Penn community have participated–including myself! Brown intends to hold the event again next year and hopes that a broader collective of Penn students will contribute their rejection experiences.

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New Media Showcase on ScholarlyCommons: Highlights!

Last October, we introduced the ScholarlyCommons New Media Showcase, a repository of exceptional student work created using new media (like videos, comic books, images, posters, maps, and web projects). ScholarlyCommons is open access and allows us to share student work on a local, national, and global level. In fact, the front page of ScholarlyCommons has a map which shows downloads in real-time! You can see student work downloaded by users globally (be careful, it can be addicting to watch!).

 

When our Digital Literacy and Research Librarian, Vickie Karasic, asked if I would like to help with the creation of the New Media Showcase by talking to students and uploading their work, I was thrilled. My favorite part of working at WIC is supporting students through technology workshops, course interactions, contests, and one-on-one consultations. The New Media Showcase is an extension of this support–we now get to show off student work to the rest of the world! The showcase is robust and growing, but today I am going to highlight some of the excellent work from each showcase category: Comics, Images, Posters, Videos, and Web Projects.

Comics: Adventures with Austin by Katharine Cunningham

Our Comics section is popular, and Katharine Cunningham’s Adventures with Austin is a big hit. This comic won 2nd prize in Penn Libraries’ Comic Book Contest in 2009.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.24.07 PM.pngImages: There is a Whole Other World Inside by Jiali Sheng

Sheng created this image for the Got Visual? Poster Contest in 2010. Penn Libraries and the Weingarten Learning Resources Center sponsored this contest to promote visual literacy on campus. Sheng created this image based on four guiding questions:

  1. What does learning mean to you?
  2. How does learning happen?
  3. What helps learning happen?
  4. Where does learning take place?

Sheng hand drew this image using a tablet. If you are interested in trying something similar, come check out our Cintiq tablet in the Vitale Digital Media Lab.

Poster by Jiali Sheng.
Poster by Jiali Sheng.

Posters: Is Feminism Still Relevant? by Madeleine Stevens

Madeleine Stevens’ poster, Is Feminism Still Relevant?, has been downloaded globally a total of 165 times since February 2015! She created this poster for the Center for Undergraduate Research & Fellowships (CURF) Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Key visual elements:

  • Cloud-like image formation
  • Central box to highlight main problem
  • Predominance of red, white, and blue colors

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.21.56 PM.png

Videos: WE by Mengxi Cissy Tan

Mengxi Cissy Tan won 1st prize for her video, WE, in the 2014 Video Contest sponsored by WIC. In this video, Tan tells a story from her childhood in her native language.

Web Projects: Coastal Zones by Gavriela Reiter

Gavriela Reiter created a beautiful web project using Piktochart. Created for Alain Plante’s ENVS 400 course in Spring 2015, Reiter creatively uses images to illustrate statistics.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.18.49 PM.png

This is only a small sampling of the incredible student work we showcase on ScholarlyCommons, and we are adding new work as quickly as it comes in. Please take some time to peruse the site and see what your fellow students are up to! The showcase is another step in WIC’s 10-year history of supporting students.

Are you interested in seeing your own work published for the world to see? Fill out our permission form!

 

image of timeline ticker

TimelineJS, the Story of WIC, and Dogs of the Web

Hi everyone!  My name is Chava Spivak-Birndorf, and I’m a new graduate intern at the Weigle Information Commons.  In the short time I’ve been here so far, I’ve been impressed by everything WIC does to bring innovative uses of technology and digital media to the Penn community.  WIC just turned 10 on April 5th, and I’m excited to join in as we celebrate everything that we love about WIC!

If you’ve visited our website recently, you may have seen our new interactive timeline.  My coworker Lahari showed me TimelineJS, an open-source tool that allows users to create interactive timelines using a Google spreadsheet.  Last year, Lahari used TimelineJS to start working on a timeline of notable events at WIC.  With WIC coming up on double digits, it seemed like the perfect time to finish the timeline and share WIC’s story.

image of WIC timelineDid we leave out any of your favorite events from WIC’s history?

Continue reading TimelineJS, the Story of WIC, and Dogs of the Web

Upcoming Events for Faculty

I wanted to spotlight three events of interest to Penn faculty and graduate students:

On Monday, April 11, Jamie Marie Estrada and I will hold a half-hour online discussion on the Philosophy of Social Media. (Register!)

On Wednesday, April 13, our panel on Library Resources for Faculty organized in collaboration with PASEF and ASEF-PSOM includes Will Noel, Dot Porter, Rebecca Stuhr, David Toccafondi, Sarah Wipperman and myself. Topics include liaison services, rare books, learning spaces, online persona and iPad apps. (Register!)

On Tuesday, April 26, our Engaging Students Through Technology Lightning Round 2016 is co-sponsored by camra, the Center for Teaching and Learning , the Graduate Student Center,  the Penn Language Center, the Price Lab for Digital Humanities,  SAS Computing and the Weingarten Learning Resources Center (VPUL) (Register!)

Speakers include:

  • Stefanie Alfonso on interactive e-guides
  • Etienne Benson on Using Processing in Humanities Classes
  • Rick Berman on WordPress for City Design
  • Lillyrose Veneziano Broccia on Project-Based Differentiation Via Canvas
  • Caroline Connolly on Poll Everywhere for In Class Polling
  • Delphine Dahan on Using LockDown Browser
  • Julie Davis on WordPress for Prints
  • Amy Durham on In-class Quizzes and Games
  • Andi Johnson on NVivo
  • Ethan Mollick on Looking Glass
  • Kris Rabberman on Voice Thread
  • Ana Reyes on Immersive Terf
  • Arjun Shankar on film and multimodal pedagogy
  • Catherine Turner on Topic Modelling Tool
  • Ben Wiggins on TimelineJS

Join us this April as we celebrate WIC’s 10th Birthday all month!