Tag Archives: Digital media

Hoesley and Seltzer Program Applications Due March 31st

We are currently accepting applications for two undergraduate programs for the 2017-2018 academic year:  the Hoesley Digital Literacy Fellows and the Seltzer Family Digital Media Awards.

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The Hoesley Program is open to current sophomores and juniors who are interested in broadening their digital literacy and technology skills and fostering career connections at Penn and beyond. This year, we are accepting a cohort of around 5-10 students. Read more about our Hoesley students in related blog posts and apply online.

The Seltzer Family Digital Media Awards provide five to six students with up to $1,000 each to purchase equipment (hardware or software) to support a new media project for one year. The equipment then gets returned to our equipment lending program for general use. Students in any year of study can apply, and special consideration is given to those in the Huntsman Program. Read more about the Seltzer Program in related blog posts and apply online.

Applications are due by Friday, March 31, so please consider applying and spread the word!

Andrea Hornick’s Journeys – Digital Media Meets Fine Art with WIC iPads

Andrea Hornick – an artist, shaman, and Fine Arts Lecturer in Penn’s School of Design – recently used WIC’s iPads in the Classroom Program to create an immersive art gallery experience.

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Continue reading Andrea Hornick’s Journeys – Digital Media Meets Fine Art with WIC iPads

Hoesley and Seltzer Programs – Apply Now!

We are currently accepting applications for two undergraduate programs for the 2016-2017 academic year:  the Hoesley Digital Literacy Fellows and the Seltzer Family Digital Media Awards.

Seltzer-Hoesley_2016_hero

The Hoesley Program is open to current sophomores and juniors who are interested in broadening their digital literacy and technology skills and fostering career connections at Penn and beyond. We generally accept a cohort of 15 students. Read more about our Hoesley students in related blog posts and apply online.

The Seltzer Family Digital Media Awards provide five to six students with up to $1,000 each to purchase equipment (hardware or software) to support a new media project for one year. The equipment then gets returned to our equipment lending program for general use. Students in any year of study can apply, and special consideration is given to those in the Huntsman Program. Read more about the Seltzer Program in related blog posts and apply online.

Applications are due by Friday, April 1, so please spread the word!

 

Announcement: Student Work now featured on ScholarlyCommons New Media Showcase

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Did you know that the Commons celebrates student work online in addition to supporting it here in our study spaces? You may remember reading about Rosie Frasso’s student projects such as Catrice’s post on Fear and Safety and Anu’s post on Pressure Release. These and other success stories are now part of library archives.

To add to the awesome, we are now displaying the results of this research on our New Media Showcase on Penn’s ScholarlyCommons platform. ScholarlyCommons is an open access institutional repository sharing the works of Penn faculty, staff, and students on a local, national, and global level. Here at WIC we were excited to get involved in showcasing some of the student work we see each semeseter–students have created videos, comic books, images, posters, maps, and web projects over the years and WIC staff loves supporting these projects through course interactions, open contests, and however else we can! The New Media Showcase is our next step in continuing this evolution. Learn more by watching this short video by Vickie Karasic to explain our Showcase.

Want to see your work on ScholarlyCommons? Faculty and students can nominate work to be considered in our Showcase! Please fill out this Google Form to submit entries and view our extended permission form.

Head over to the New Media Showcase to check out the research itself.

No More #nofilter?

Instagram-Logo My name is Samantha Kannegiser and I am a new intern at the Weigle Information Commons. When my colleague Jaime suggested I write a post about photo filters I was unsure how interesting a topic it would be. However, after reading a new study conducted by Yahoo! Labs I was intrigued. The study finds that the ways in which we use filters on the photos we share affects those photos’ popularity and tendency to produce interaction through comments. The focus was on users of Flickr’s mobile application, and it is worth mentioning that Yahoo! Labs is a division of Yahoo!, the company which owns Flickr.

When considering the importance of these findings, think about why social photo sharing sites like Flickr and Instagram are so popular (92 million and 300 million users respectively). Mobile capabilities make it easy for us to quickly snap and document moments in our days, creating a sometimes overwhelming digital collection of memories. The desire to document and preserve is age-old and only part of this process, though. Photo sharing sites have made it possible for us to use our photos to tell a story to friends, acquaintances, and even strangers while also allowing us to interact socially in a digital setting. These snapshots of our lives are no longer bound to film and photo albums, but are now part of a larger story.

Continue reading No More #nofilter?

What We Can Learn from K-12 Educators

When a colleague suggested that I attend the ISTE Conference for K-12 educators, I was a bit skeptical. I thought, “What can I learn from K-12 educators that would be applicable to the undergraduates – and often graduate students and faculty members – I work with as a librarian?” However, as I browsed through the workshop and session descriptions, I realized that we in higher education can take a few pages from the books of K-12 educators to enhance teaching and learning at the college level. Here are some highlights I took away from the conference:

  1. Image by Greg Kulowiec (App Smashing App Pack)
    Image by Greg Kulowiec, retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/pcrxrqy

    1. iPad Apps. There are so many. Whenever someone asks me for app recommendations, I often turn to my “go-to’s” without doing much more hunting. In a workshop about using tablets in the classroom, I learned so much about app integration for both content (student learning) and creation (student making). For example, AppFusion or App Smashing is the process of using several apps to create different parts of a project, and then using one app to pull all the parts together. One such “fusion” app is ThinkLink, which can incorporate sound, video, images and text to create a short presentation, much like a PowerPoint or Prezi. Learning about all of these different apps stressed our responsibility in higher education to be knowledgeable about a variety of apps for different functions, such as video creation, white board drawing, or photo editing. A grid with apps, their functions, preferred platforms, etc. is a simple tool that we can develop to help students and faculty choose the right apps to use in the classroom, especially as we prepare new iPads for our lending program this fall.

  2. Image from https://conversationprism.com/
    Image retrieved from https://conversationprism.com/

    “Deeper learning.” Learning in the classroom is great, but if it can’t be applied to real-life situations, it may not stick for all students. Presenters Chris Dede of Harvard and Julie Evans of Project Tomorrow explained that “deeper learning” involves this connection between learning and life, and also spoke about essential strategies for mobile learning, stemming from their 2014 Qualcomm report, The 8 Essentials for Mobile Learning Success in Education. One of the highlights included a video of an augmented reality project where students interacted with hotspots on their mobile devices when out studying a pond in order to reinforce ecological concepts. The presenters also stressed the importance of how students use social media platforms to think together and share information, and offered a great resource called the Conversation Prism. One point that stuck with me in terms of working with students and faculty at Penn involved developing fluency in interactive media. Chris Dede made the point that often, we have to create communities of “unlearning” the more traditional methods we’re used to, in order to become fluent in various media and collaborative, inquiry-based learning strategies. This is a tall measure for folks in higher-ed, but nevertheless something I believe we should all be striving toward.

  3. Backchannels. A backchannel is a second form of communication that takes place at the same time as a face-to-face session, whether it’s a lecture, conference session, or other learning activity. In a great session on backchannels, where we modeled this behavior during the presentation, a high school teacher and college professor explained how they use backchannels, why they’re useful in the classroom, and shared a variety of different channels to consider. In one class, students used a backchannel while watching a video in order to answer certain questions about content and also ask questions of the teacher and other students. Backchannels, which include popular options like Twitter (using a class hashtag, for example), Today’s Meet, and Backchannelchat.com, can be a great way of getting students who usually don’t participate to join the conversation. In a “fishbowl” scenario, students on the outer edge of the class can be using the backchannel, while those on the inner circle can be paying attention real-time, and then roles reverse halfway through class. On certain platforms, students can remain anonymous to each other on a backchannel, but the instructor knows who’s chatting and can do some formative assessment. Some other backchannel platforms include Piazza, Tozzl, and Socrative. We often get questions from faculty about backchannels here at WIC, and this presentation made me feel more prepared to recommend different tools and discuss the pros and cons of using backchannels in teaching and learning.

Other great resources I learned about at ISTE included those about digital and media literacy, such as Common Sense Media’s digital citizenship curriculum, and how to teach and implement digital literacy using strategies from the Center for Media Literacy. I learned so much from K-12 educators at the ISTE conference. I now have some new goals and much personal learning to do as we prepare for the fall semester!

Senior Research Spotlight

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The gong will strictly enforce the two-minute time limit!

Event canceled – please check back for similar events in the future

Are you a graduating senior? Have you been working hard on a senior thesis or project lately? Does your project involve new media? Can you talk fast?

If all of the above apply to you, we welcome you to submit a proposal for our Senior Research Spotlight. Together with co-sponsors CURF, CWiC, and Weingarten Learning Resources Center (VPUL), we invite twenty graduating seniors in any of the four undergraduate schools at Penn to share their work that involves new media (audio, video, image collections, software, 3D printing…) in a collegial atmosphere in front of peers, faculty, librarians, and administrators from around campus.

Presentations will consist of two-minute lightning talks, with time strictly enforced by the gong pictured above! The event will take place on Thursday, April 29, 2015, at 3pm in the Class of 1978 Pavilion, Kislak Center, 6th Floor of Van Pelt Library. The room will be set up theater-style, and students will stand at the front podium to deliver their talks.

For more details, please see the event website. If you are interested in participating, submit a registration form by Friday, April 24, 2015, by 5 pm. To consider your submission, all we need by April 24 is the registration form. If you’d like to attend the event, please register here.  We hope you’ll join us on April 29th!