Tag Archives: video

New Media Showcase on ScholarlyCommons: Highlights!

Last October, we introduced the ScholarlyCommons New Media Showcase, a repository of exceptional student work created using new media (like videos, comic books, images, posters, maps, and web projects). ScholarlyCommons is open access and allows us to share student work on a local, national, and global level. In fact, the front page of ScholarlyCommons has a map which shows downloads in real-time! You can see student work downloaded by users globally (be careful, it can be addicting to watch!).

 

When our Digital Literacy and Research Librarian, Vickie Karasic, asked if I would like to help with the creation of the New Media Showcase by talking to students and uploading their work, I was thrilled. My favorite part of working at WIC is supporting students through technology workshops, course interactions, contests, and one-on-one consultations. The New Media Showcase is an extension of this support–we now get to show off student work to the rest of the world! The showcase is robust and growing, but today I am going to highlight some of the excellent work from each showcase category: Comics, Images, Posters, Videos, and Web Projects.

Comics: Adventures with Austin by Katharine Cunningham

Our Comics section is popular, and Katharine Cunningham’s Adventures with Austin is a big hit. This comic won 2nd prize in Penn Libraries’ Comic Book Contest in 2009.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.24.07 PM.pngImages: There is a Whole Other World Inside by Jiali Sheng

Sheng created this image for the Got Visual? Poster Contest in 2010. Penn Libraries and the Weingarten Learning Resources Center sponsored this contest to promote visual literacy on campus. Sheng created this image based on four guiding questions:

  1. What does learning mean to you?
  2. How does learning happen?
  3. What helps learning happen?
  4. Where does learning take place?

Sheng hand drew this image using a tablet. If you are interested in trying something similar, come check out our Cintiq tablet in the Vitale Digital Media Lab.

Poster by Jiali Sheng.
Poster by Jiali Sheng.

Posters: Is Feminism Still Relevant? by Madeleine Stevens

Madeleine Stevens’ poster, Is Feminism Still Relevant?, has been downloaded globally a total of 165 times since February 2015! She created this poster for the Center for Undergraduate Research & Fellowships (CURF) Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Key visual elements:

  • Cloud-like image formation
  • Central box to highlight main problem
  • Predominance of red, white, and blue colors

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.21.56 PM.png

Videos: WE by Mengxi Cissy Tan

Mengxi Cissy Tan won 1st prize for her video, WE, in the 2014 Video Contest sponsored by WIC. In this video, Tan tells a story from her childhood in her native language.

Web Projects: Coastal Zones by Gavriela Reiter

Gavriela Reiter created a beautiful web project using Piktochart. Created for Alain Plante’s ENVS 400 course in Spring 2015, Reiter creatively uses images to illustrate statistics.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.18.49 PM.png

This is only a small sampling of the incredible student work we showcase on ScholarlyCommons, and we are adding new work as quickly as it comes in. Please take some time to peruse the site and see what your fellow students are up to! The showcase is another step in WIC’s 10-year history of supporting students.

Are you interested in seeing your own work published for the world to see? Fill out our permission form!

 

Symposium videos reveal our robust campus community..

Symposium 2015 LogoThanks to our dedicated team of sponsors and organizers and our powerful presenters, we have received wonderful feedback from the 2015 Engaging Students Through Technology Symposium. One of my favorite comments inspired the title for this blog post:

“The community of people doing innovative things with tech at Penn is actually quite robust, and I felt like I was reintroduced to it in a really delightful way. We could probably do a better job maintaining that community all year long.”

We brought together over 150 faculty, staff and graduate students from all twelve Penn schools for an intense program of speakers and discussions. Our student survey responses and student and faculty panel presenters inspired conversation.

As our photo album shows, our audience stayed active and engaged throughout a very long Friday. I welcome you to browse the recently-posted presenter slides and videos and share with colleagues.  Highlighted tools include Twitter (with Alain Plante and Emily Steiner), the LightBoard (with Phil Gressman), wikis (with Joe Farrell), Panopto lecture recording (with Peter Fader) and a variety of apps and web resources. The playlist below includes 22 videos!

Save the date: The 2016 Symposium will take place on Friday, October 28!

Exam vs. Nobel chat?

Students from Chem 251 class
Eric Shiuey and Evan Selzer

Should I take my organic chemistry exam or accept an invitation for coffee with a Nobel Prize winning scientist?  Eric Shiuey C’16 and Evan Selzer C’16 hesitated. Fortunately, their professor Jeffery Saven set them straight. Exam rescheduled!

The two students  set off for a chat at the Inn at Penn with Dr. Stanley Prusiner, winner of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

A few weeks earlier, Eric and Evan had created a video for the course CHEM 251, Principles of Biological Chemistry. They had pored over journal articles on prions, a new class of pathogens discovered by Dr. Prusiner. As part of the assignment, students share links to their videos with the scientists whose work is referenced. Eric and Evan wrote to six scientists and four responded with feedback. One email brought a surprise! An invitation to meet with Dr. Prusiner when he visited Penn this April as part of the Year of Health activities.

Vickie Karasic and I met recently with Eric, Evan and Jeff to get the scoop.. Continue reading Exam vs. Nobel chat?

What does Healthy look like?

What does Healthy look like?
What does Healthy look like?

Our thanks to William Hodgson for an inspired graphic for this year’s video contest! All made from scratch on Illustrator of course.

Typing our contest prompt into YouTube search brings up videos about orchids, mental health, relationships, cooking, exercise, social justice and horses’ hooves. We are curious to see what Penn students will make of this year’s question. Videos are due on May 7. So get your three-minute video in soon! We have received four videos to date.

The first prize will be a $500 videocamera plus lots of national attention! In previous years, many of our video contest entries have gone viral.  Check out our winners from 2014 and earlier years. A viral video on health – now there’s irony..

Screening Scholarship Media Festival 2015

CAMRA
CAMRA Festival Poster

We are looking forward to camra‘s annual media festival on March 27 and 28. Our partnership with camra has brought us fun times exploring audio and video. Past festivals have featured student-created videos including the Rubber video from Lisa Mitchell’s class and the great work of our own Lindsey Martin (after two years, we still miss her at WIC!). The Screening Scholarship Media Festival is a great place to meet colleagues interested in new media. As they describe:

"We explore the affordances and challenges of multimodal representational strategies in research, and we interrogate their social implications. SSMF is a hybrid between a traditional academic conference and a film/media festival."

We hope you will join us at the 2015 SSMF – check out the Festival Schedule

Treehouse by Interlude

Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 3.51.43 PM

When coming across Interlude’s well designed website, the first thing they’ll tell you is that we’re entering a new way of telling stories. I think they’re right, with more platforms on which to watch films, television shows, and everything in between, we’ve got to figure out better ways to tell the stories we want to tell. Continue reading Treehouse by Interlude

Illegible Text/Subtitles in your Video?

Sometimes you’ll create a video with subtitles that look fine in iMovie, Final Cut Pro, or Premiere, but when you export it, the text in the final version looks distorted and is barely readable.

These suggestions for avoiding that problem comes from the folks at Telestream.  Although it comes from the user manual for their ScreenFlow software, which we use in the Vitale Digital Media Lab, it also applies when you’re exporting videos from your video editing program of choice:

Digital video was designed primarily for capturing real world images, so it is often difficult to capture the thin lines of text legibly. Here are a few tips to consider when you are using text in your video:

  • Use larger point sizes (e.g., at least 25 points or more). Larger characters always render better than small ones.
  • Do not use serif fonts (e.g,. Times Roman). Always use sans-serif fonts (e.g., Arial or Helvetica).
  • Use boldface fonts, since they render better, especially at smaller sizes.
  • Do not use odd values for the output movie’s frame height or width. Always use even numbers. Also, input sources having odd height or width values can result in illegible titles.
  • Always generate non-interlaced video. Interlaced video is much more prone to poor quality text rendering because it may introduce flickering.