Tag Archives: Small business

Learning how to teach (Excel)

ImageThis guest post comes to us from Nicolette Tan, a junior in the College studying political science. She wrote this reflection essay during her participation in MGMT 353 Wharton Field Challenge in fall 2013. WIC staff assisted students in the seminar taught by Arjun Bhaskar and Samaira Sirajee with guidance from Professor Keith Weigelt in learning how to present Excel skills to small business owners in Philadelphia.

It’s one thing to know how to use Excel yourself; it’s another to be able to teach it.  Today’s workshop definitely showed me that teaching is hard, and even more so when you’ve only met these people for the first time. The class got off on a high note, when Grace asked the class to “Raise your hand if you’re excited about learning Excel!” and people cheered and raised their hands enthusiastically. One thing that strikes me every time is the positivity that the students bring to the class, and how eager they are to improve themselves – regardless of age or background, and I have so much respect for that. Continue reading Learning how to teach (Excel)

Penn DH Forum: Measuring Well-Being Using Social Media

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A typical “female” word cloud. Image courtesy of the World Well-Being Project.

A couple of us from WIC recently attended a Digital Humanities Forum event called “Measuring Well-Being Using Social Media,” showcasing a joint project between the Department of Computer and Information Science and the Penn Positive Psychology Center.  As part of the World Well-Being Project at Penn, researchers Lyle Ungar and Andy Schwartz are using “differential language analysis” on massive amounts of data from social media sources, such as Facebook and Twitter, in order to gauge peoples’ emotions at the time they post a status update or Tweet.  The project used a Facebook app called myPersonality to track users’ status updates.  The researchers then created data clouds that show word frequencies and gender correlations with word usage.

Word clouds were grouped by the “Big Five” personality traits, which have been studied and documented in personality tests:  Extraversion, Agreeableness, Contentiousness, Neuroticism, and Openness (see the World Well-Being site for further explanations); these were further categorized by gender and age group.  The researchers found that college-aged students (ages 19-22), for example, used words and phrases such as “semester,” “campus” and “in_the_library,” versus the post-college group (ages 23-29), who used phrases like “at_work,” “new_job,” “library” (we’re glad the post-college folks are still referencing the library!).  The discussion became very animated as everyone tried to analyze their own age group and gender based on the word clouds! Continue reading Penn DH Forum: Measuring Well-Being Using Social Media