Tag Archives: digital scholarship

Announcement: Student Work now featured on ScholarlyCommons New Media Showcase

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Did you know that the Commons celebrates student work online in addition to supporting it here in our study spaces? You may remember reading about Rosie Frasso’s student projects such as Catrice’s post on Fear and Safety and Anu’s post on Pressure Release. These and other success stories are now part of library archives.

To add to the awesome, we are now displaying the results of this research on our New Media Showcase on Penn’s ScholarlyCommons platform. ScholarlyCommons is an open access institutional repository sharing the works of Penn faculty, staff, and students on a local, national, and global level. Here at WIC we were excited to get involved in showcasing some of the student work we see each semeseter–students have created videos, comic books, images, posters, maps, and web projects over the years and WIC staff loves supporting these projects through course interactions, open contests, and however else we can! The New Media Showcase is our next step in continuing this evolution. Learn more by watching this short video by Vickie Karasic to explain our Showcase.

Want to see your work on ScholarlyCommons? Faculty and students can nominate work to be considered in our Showcase! Please fill out this Google Form to submit entries and view our extended permission form.

Head over to the New Media Showcase to check out the research itself.

A Fab Fall for the (Digital) Humanities

As the days get shorter and the weather much chillier, I’m not only reminded of how quickly fall semester is passing, but also of the many great humanities and digital humanities events I’ve had the chance to attend over the past few months here at Penn.

HAIKUIt seems appropriate to kick off a discussion of the humanities at Penn with the (wonderfully and fittingly named) HAIKU Conference: The Humanities and Arts in the Integrated Knowledge University. The conference, sponsored by the Office of the Provost’s Art & Culture Initiative, offered two days of multidisciplinary presentations, discussions, and performances addressing questions such as, “What do the humanities and the arts have to offer contemporary efforts to integrate distinct bodies of knowledge within the research university?” and “How will the humanities and the arts retain their specificity within this climate of integration and is it even important that they do so?” Scholars discussed topics including (but not limited to): what “art-making” means in the 21st century and the importance of the artist in the academic community; using digital storytelling to capture the history and memory of a particular community; questions of how translation can lead to inequality in representing a culture or nation; and the trajectory of creative writing programs in US higher education, as they differ from core literary programs.  The breadth in topic diversity at HAIKU indicated the continued influence of the arts and humanities on various research disciplines and how they enlighten all of us who make up the “integrated knowledge university.”

Continue reading A Fab Fall for the (Digital) Humanities

New Digital Scholarship Workshops @ Penn Libraries

We are offering a new round of workshops this semester and the next one is coming right up.

 Introduction to Text Mining
Learn the why and the how of text mining, its methodology, cautionary tales, and preferred tools. If you have experience to share, please come and join the discussion! Presented by Mitch Fraas, Penn Libraries, Kislak Center and Digital Humanities Forum, Molly Des Jardins, Penn Libraries Area Studies Specialist for Japanese Studies, Dot Porter, Penn Libraries, Kislak Center Curator for Digital Servies.
12:00pm – 1:00pm, Wednesday, October 8, 2014,Kislak Center Seminar Room 625, 6th Floor. Van Pelt-Dietrich
Register: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event.php?id=794247

And two more to follow:

Make the Most of your Visit to the Archives
Returning to the libraries to share their insights into working effectively in archives, Professor J.C. Cloutier, English and History Ph.D. Candidate Emily Merrill will provide guidance both practical and philosophical on making the most of the often limited, and therefore precious, time available for conducting research in archives. Join us to prepare a tool kit for your backpack and for your mind.
12:00pm – 1:00pm, Thursday, October 30, 2014, Kislak Center Seminar Room 625, 6th Floor. Van Pelt-Dietrich
Register: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event.php?id=794373

Sharing Research Through Social Media: Scholarly Commons, Academia.edu, and more
Your opportunities to share and discover scholarly work across a global community are expanding, from the Penn Libraries’ ScholarlyCommons, to social media sites for academics, which include Academia.edu, ResearchGATE and more. What are the intellectual property issues, how might these sites intersect and complement each other? What are the overall benefits? Join us to explore these issues whether you are just beginning to think about posting your work or already doing it and willing to share your thoughts and experiences.12:00pm – 1:00pm, Tuesday, November 11, 2014, Kislak Center Seminar Room 625, 6th Floor. Van Pelt-Dietrich.
Register: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event.php?id=794251

Questions? Contact stuhrreb@pobox.upenn.edu

Flipping the Classroom: A WIC Year in Review

Each year, Penn Libraries holds a Pecha Kucha event as the culmination of the year’s Public Services Forum meetings.  The event provides librarians a chance to share research, past projects, or new ideas for the upcoming year.  This year, I decided to do my 20×20 presentation on my experiences with video tools for flipping the classroom over the past year at WIC.  In particular, I focused on our work with educators at the Penn Language Center (PLC) in conjunction with their Certificate in Instructional Technologies and Online Learning.  After working with PLC language educators over the past year, we also enjoyed viewing the outcomes of their projects in May at the PLC Annual Teaching and Showcase Award Program.

Such projects have inspired us to host new events, like Scholarship, De-Printed, and offer new workshops on flipped classroom and other audio/video tools for showcasing online teaching and research.  It’s also tempted us to look back on the various video projects we have participated in with language classes and document these in a publication that we’re working on for the CALICO Book Series.

Please take a look at my presentation above to see our adventures this past year in flipped classroom tools at WIC (spoiler alert – my Prezi recording goes over the strict 5 minutes for Pecha Kucha!).

PhillyDH@Penn

PhillyDH@PennWe are excited to announce that PhillyDH@Penn will be back for a second year on Friday, June 20, 2014, in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, 6th floor of Van Pelt Library. PhillyDH@Penn is a digital humanities unconference, planned by folks from the PhillyDH group and Penn Libraries. Last year’s unconference drew attendees working in schools, libraries, museums, cultural and historical institutions around the Philadelphia-area and beyond.

This year’s unconference will feature a lightning round, hour-long workshops sessions, and many unconference sessions (learn more about unconferences). Anyone at any level of DH scholarship is welcome to attend – we have the most basic workshops and more advanced sessions. Most importantly, PhillyDH@Penn provides an opportunity to learn, network with colleagues, and bring this knowledge back to your own DH endeavors.

Registration is now open. We are also looking for unconference session ideas, to be decided the day-of by participants. If you can’t think of a session at the time you register, you can use another form to propose a session any time up until (and even the morning of!) June 20.

We look forward to a dynamic day of learning and networking, and we hope to see you there!

Trip to the Archives Part II, The Scholar’s Perspective

If you are planning on making a trip to the archives this summer or in the months to come, you will want to attend the last of our Digital Scholarship Workshops, A Trip to the Archives Part II. For those of you who didn’t make it to Part I, our Archival Manuscript Cataloger, Holly Mengel described the archival organization of material, and the tools prepared by archivists to make that material discoverable.

On Tuesday, April 15 at noon, please plan to join us for the scholar’s perspective on making the best and most productive use of archives. We are happy to have Emily Merrill,  PhD candidate in history and Penn Humanities Forum Fellow and Dr. Jean-Christophe Cloutier, Penn Professor of English joining us to talk about their own personal practices of discovery, collecting and recording, filing and scholarly use of archives. Emily Merrill is an 18th century American history specialist and Dr. Cloutier works with 20th century literature and has worked as a rare books and manuscripts archivist.

In addition to describing their own experiences and methodology, our two presenters will provide guidance in establishing a relationship with the archives in which you’ll be working and recommendations for tool selection and purchase.

We hope to see you at the Kislack Center, Room 625, on April 15, Tuesday, at Noon.

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