Tag Archives: digital humanities

Looking Back at ϟLightning Roundϟ 2015

Welcome back to another semester! Now, where were we? Ah yes, I think it was something about Topic Modelling, Text Wrangling, 3D Printing, or EDrawing? To help jog your memory (and ours) we’ve just uploaded all 18 of the Lightning Round presentations from this past spring. Have a look at the playlist below and get amped to keep the discussion moving at the upcoming Engaging Students Through Technology Symposium, taking place this year on Friday, October 30th!

Italian Madrigals on WIC iPads

manuscript copy
Image from event website

When Professor Mauro Calcagno submitted a request to borrow 5 WIC iPads, I figured it was for his students to use for coursework, which is typically the case with our iPads in the Classroom Program. However, I was intrigued to find out that the iPads would be used by the Penn Madrigal Singers to perform digital editions of 16th-century composer Luca Marenzio’s work. I was lucky enough to attend the event last week, which was organized by the Penn Music Department, the Center for Italian Studies, and the Penn Libraries’ Kislak Center, and co-sponsored by the Digital Humanities Forum. It was so fascinating to see both the digital humanities project that Mauro and his colleagues are working on and the fantastic performance by the Penn Madrigal Singers!

Continue reading Italian Madrigals on WIC iPads

Representing the Complexities of War Online: Dyana (Wing) So, C’16 and her summer in Israel

dyanaLast summer,  Dyana (Wing) So, a college junior majoring in Visual Studies, visited Israel to work on an IIP summer internship sponsored by Penn. In an interview with Blake Cole and Manda McElrath from SAS Frontiers, she talks about her experience there. She discusses her interest in comparisons between virtuality and virtual reality, and shares how being on social media shaped and reshaped her world view.

While she was in Israel, and as part of her internship duties, she wrote for an online news website, NoCamels.com, focusing on technology. She has continued writing for them upon her return, and her latest two pieces are on cyber security and green gardening. Continue reading Representing the Complexities of War Online: Dyana (Wing) So, C’16 and her summer in Israel

A Fab Fall for the (Digital) Humanities

As the days get shorter and the weather much chillier, I’m not only reminded of how quickly fall semester is passing, but also of the many great humanities and digital humanities events I’ve had the chance to attend over the past few months here at Penn.

HAIKUIt seems appropriate to kick off a discussion of the humanities at Penn with the (wonderfully and fittingly named) HAIKU Conference: The Humanities and Arts in the Integrated Knowledge University. The conference, sponsored by the Office of the Provost’s Art & Culture Initiative, offered two days of multidisciplinary presentations, discussions, and performances addressing questions such as, “What do the humanities and the arts have to offer contemporary efforts to integrate distinct bodies of knowledge within the research university?” and “How will the humanities and the arts retain their specificity within this climate of integration and is it even important that they do so?” Scholars discussed topics including (but not limited to): what “art-making” means in the 21st century and the importance of the artist in the academic community; using digital storytelling to capture the history and memory of a particular community; questions of how translation can lead to inequality in representing a culture or nation; and the trajectory of creative writing programs in US higher education, as they differ from core literary programs.  The breadth in topic diversity at HAIKU indicated the continued influence of the arts and humanities on various research disciplines and how they enlighten all of us who make up the “integrated knowledge university.”

Continue reading A Fab Fall for the (Digital) Humanities

Cut and Paste, Then and Now

Last week, we had the rare opportunity to chat with this year’s Andrew W. Mellon Undergraduate Fellows in the Humanities thanks to Kimberly Kolor, a fellow who is also in the Hoesley Digital Literacy Fellows Program. We prepared by brainstorming around this year’s theme of “Color”, a wonderfully flexible and creative theme indeed. Vickie Karasic, Katie Rawson and Rebecca Stuhr joined me in providing a whirlwind tour of tools (Artemis, Instagram, Gephi, Excel, PhotoShop, and more). We talked about how fast the tools are changing, and how one is never really ever up-to-date. As I was listening to the students describe individual research projects and the presenters explain how digital humanities tools make new types of inquiry possible, I was struck once again by how useful metaphors can be for sense-making across contexts and disciplines. In a recent post on the Schoenberg Institute’s blog for example, Dot Porter provides a beautifully detailed tour of reuse and adaptation over the centuries. I loved this image of medieval cut-and-paste followed swiftly by find-and-replace in XML. As we explore ways to “mashup” video and images, I wonder if future generations will look through our creations, painstakingly reconstruct the steps we took, and speculate about our motivations and logic!

New Digital Scholarship Workshops @ Penn Libraries

We are offering a new round of workshops this semester and the next one is coming right up.

 Introduction to Text Mining
Learn the why and the how of text mining, its methodology, cautionary tales, and preferred tools. If you have experience to share, please come and join the discussion! Presented by Mitch Fraas, Penn Libraries, Kislak Center and Digital Humanities Forum, Molly Des Jardins, Penn Libraries Area Studies Specialist for Japanese Studies, Dot Porter, Penn Libraries, Kislak Center Curator for Digital Servies.
12:00pm – 1:00pm, Wednesday, October 8, 2014,Kislak Center Seminar Room 625, 6th Floor. Van Pelt-Dietrich
Register: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event.php?id=794247

And two more to follow:

Make the Most of your Visit to the Archives
Returning to the libraries to share their insights into working effectively in archives, Professor J.C. Cloutier, English and History Ph.D. Candidate Emily Merrill will provide guidance both practical and philosophical on making the most of the often limited, and therefore precious, time available for conducting research in archives. Join us to prepare a tool kit for your backpack and for your mind.
12:00pm – 1:00pm, Thursday, October 30, 2014, Kislak Center Seminar Room 625, 6th Floor. Van Pelt-Dietrich
Register: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event.php?id=794373

Sharing Research Through Social Media: Scholarly Commons, Academia.edu, and more
Your opportunities to share and discover scholarly work across a global community are expanding, from the Penn Libraries’ ScholarlyCommons, to social media sites for academics, which include Academia.edu, ResearchGATE and more. What are the intellectual property issues, how might these sites intersect and complement each other? What are the overall benefits? Join us to explore these issues whether you are just beginning to think about posting your work or already doing it and willing to share your thoughts and experiences.12:00pm – 1:00pm, Tuesday, November 11, 2014, Kislak Center Seminar Room 625, 6th Floor. Van Pelt-Dietrich.
Register: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event.php?id=794251

Questions? Contact stuhrreb@pobox.upenn.edu

PhillyDH@Penn

PhillyDH@PennWe are excited to announce that PhillyDH@Penn will be back for a second year on Friday, June 20, 2014, in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, 6th floor of Van Pelt Library. PhillyDH@Penn is a digital humanities unconference, planned by folks from the PhillyDH group and Penn Libraries. Last year’s unconference drew attendees working in schools, libraries, museums, cultural and historical institutions around the Philadelphia-area and beyond.

This year’s unconference will feature a lightning round, hour-long workshops sessions, and many unconference sessions (learn more about unconferences). Anyone at any level of DH scholarship is welcome to attend – we have the most basic workshops and more advanced sessions. Most importantly, PhillyDH@Penn provides an opportunity to learn, network with colleagues, and bring this knowledge back to your own DH endeavors.

Registration is now open. We are also looking for unconference session ideas, to be decided the day-of by participants. If you can’t think of a session at the time you register, you can use another form to propose a session any time up until (and even the morning of!) June 20.

We look forward to a dynamic day of learning and networking, and we hope to see you there!