All posts by samanthack

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New Media Showcase on ScholarlyCommons: Highlights!

Last October, we introduced the ScholarlyCommons New Media Showcase, a repository of exceptional student work created using new media (like videos, comic books, images, posters, maps, and web projects). ScholarlyCommons is open access and allows us to share student work on a local, national, and global level. In fact, the front page of ScholarlyCommons has a map which shows downloads in real-time! You can see student work downloaded by users globally (be careful, it can be addicting to watch!).

 

When our Digital Literacy and Research Librarian, Vickie Karasic, asked if I would like to help with the creation of the New Media Showcase by talking to students and uploading their work, I was thrilled. My favorite part of working at WIC is supporting students through technology workshops, course interactions, contests, and one-on-one consultations. The New Media Showcase is an extension of this support–we now get to show off student work to the rest of the world! The showcase is robust and growing, but today I am going to highlight some of the excellent work from each showcase category: Comics, Images, Posters, Videos, and Web Projects.

Comics: Adventures with Austin by Katharine Cunningham

Our Comics section is popular, and Katharine Cunningham’s Adventures with Austin is a big hit. This comic won 2nd prize in Penn Libraries’ Comic Book Contest in 2009.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.24.07 PM.pngImages: There is a Whole Other World Inside by Jiali Sheng

Sheng created this image for the Got Visual? Poster Contest in 2010. Penn Libraries and the Weingarten Learning Resources Center sponsored this contest to promote visual literacy on campus. Sheng created this image based on four guiding questions:

  1. What does learning mean to you?
  2. How does learning happen?
  3. What helps learning happen?
  4. Where does learning take place?

Sheng hand drew this image using a tablet. If you are interested in trying something similar, come check out our Cintiq tablet in the Vitale Digital Media Lab.

Poster by Jiali Sheng.
Poster by Jiali Sheng.

Posters: Is Feminism Still Relevant? by Madeleine Stevens

Madeleine Stevens’ poster, Is Feminism Still Relevant?, has been downloaded globally a total of 165 times since February 2015! She created this poster for the Center for Undergraduate Research & Fellowships (CURF) Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Key visual elements:

  • Cloud-like image formation
  • Central box to highlight main problem
  • Predominance of red, white, and blue colors

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Videos: WE by Mengxi Cissy Tan

Mengxi Cissy Tan won 1st prize for her video, WE, in the 2014 Video Contest sponsored by WIC. In this video, Tan tells a story from her childhood in her native language.

Web Projects: Coastal Zones by Gavriela Reiter

Gavriela Reiter created a beautiful web project using Piktochart. Created for Alain Plante’s ENVS 400 course in Spring 2015, Reiter creatively uses images to illustrate statistics.

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This is only a small sampling of the incredible student work we showcase on ScholarlyCommons, and we are adding new work as quickly as it comes in. Please take some time to peruse the site and see what your fellow students are up to! The showcase is another step in WIC’s 10-year history of supporting students.

Are you interested in seeing your own work published for the world to see? Fill out our permission form!

 

Screening Scholarship Media Festival – Register Now!

12801414_575662232605151_629284921179087757_nWe are happy to announce that registration is open for the fourth annual Screening Scholarship Media Festival (SSMF) scheduled for April 1-2, 2016. This year, SSMF will highlight multimodal projects during two days of screenings and discussions showcasing film, soundscapes, recordings, blogs, websites, eBooks, animations, photographs, installations, and other media forms. This year’s theme is Race, Media and Social Justice.

SSMF is hosted by CAMRA, the media pedagogy lab focused on using film, web platforms, social media, and other media technologies towards university research. WIC has partnered with CAMRA and in past festivals have featured student-created videos including the Rubber video from Lisa Mitchell’s class and the great work of our own Lindsey Martin.

The festival begins on April 1st with a discussion between journalist and scholar Dr. Marc Lamont Hill and filmmaker Michele Stephenson on race in the contemporary moment.

The second day, April 2nd will include a day of panels, screenings and discussions, featuring a keynote event with Dr Adrienne Keene, Dr. Todd Wolfson, Dr. Bianca Williams, Sandra Khalifa, and Tara Conley who will reflect on digital media and social activism as it relates to their respective expertise in scholarship, art, and activism.

Registration is free and open to the public. To register or for a detailed schedule visit: http://camrapenn.org/ssmf/. If you have any questions, contact CAMRA at: ssmf@camrapenn.org.

Also take a look back at what happened in SSMF 2015, 2014, 2013!

Commons’ Publications: Reviewed

CoverLearnerInteractionsOnlineThe Commons’ staff are no stranger to publishing and have written about technology, learning, collaboration, and teaching tools, all things we love at WIC. Recently, WIC Digital Projects Fellow Vickie Karasic and director Anu Vedantham wrote a chapter for Researching Language Learners Interactions Online: From Social Media to MOOCs (Dixon and Thomas). Their chapter, “Video Creation Tools for Language Learning: Lessons Learned” focuses on digital video creation tools and the benefit of using video assignments for language learning. Their chapter received a brief mention in a book review by Elena Martin-Monje this month:

 

“…video assignments enhance the understanding of other languages and cultures, while at the same time they enable students to be more aware of their own identity through this learning process.”

Vickie has written about this project before, including details of interviewing language faculty members at Penn. She has also showcased her workshop on using Audio and Video in PowerPoint for Beginning Japanese.

Read other reports and publications written about the Commons (the Educause article made 2014’s Top Ten Most Read list) and check out our monthly workshops if you are interested in learning some of the same tech tools referenced in the book!

Life with Technology at Penn: Student Research Exhibit

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Dr. Rosemary Frasso, Allison Golinkoff (TA)  and graduate student research team– Qualitative Research Methods for Social Work and Public Health Professionals (SW 781) Fall 2015

As everyone trickles back in to the library this semester, take some time to walk towards the Van Pelt Collaborative Classroom (right before the WIC entrance, to the right) to see Dr. Rosemary Frasso’s graduate students’ research exhibit Life with Technology Among University of Pennsylvania Students. Dr. Frasso’s previous research exhibits include Pressure Release and Fear and Safety at Penn. I took some time this week to make my way through the exhibit and found it interesting to see how Penn students are understanding technology’s role in their lives. Here at WIC we post about tech frequently, and this past year alone we’ve discussed new ways of using social media tools, using apps for productivity and travel, and our experiences with 3d printingLife with Technology takes a more in-depth look into the complicated ways students’ lives intersect with technology that can be both useful and intrusive. The exhibit  is organized into thematic categories: Changing Times, Dependence, Disconnected, Efficiency, Health, Multitasking. Privacy, Social Connections, Ubiquitous, Unplugged, and Work and Education.

In order to decide on a topic, students used Nominal Group Technique (NGT) in order to come to a consensus representative of the group’s preferences. Interviews were then conducted using photo elicitation (first named by photographer and researcher John Collier in 1957) in which a qualitative interview is guided by photographs taken by study participants. Each student recruited one participant, an undergraduate or graduate student from Penn, and explained the study to them. The topic of the project was explained and participants were asked to “define and explore the meaning of ‘life with technology’ over the course of one week using their phones to document their exploration.” Ultimately, the research team decided together on which images and quotes to use in the exhibit and how these pieces fit into categories. Some memorable images include dried cranberries, Penn classrooms, a kitchen stove, and selfies.

From here, students will use NVivo 10 software for thematic analysis, and members of the research team will then identify salient themes, summarize findings, prepare an abstract for presentation, and a manuscript for publication. The exhibit is beautiful and engaging, so please come by and check it out at the  Van Pelt Collaborative Classroom. 

If you are interested in using NVivo software, consider joining our NVivo User Group which meets monthly with a guest presenter for each session.

Celebrate Halloween with PicMonkey

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Happy almost Halloween! Personally, I think Halloween is the best part of the season–costumes, candy, and decorations! For that last part, PicMonkey offers some free seasonal photo editing tools to make some fun DIY decor.

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To get started, just open a photo in PicMonkey. You will see an icon of a cat–this is for the Halloween themes.

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As you can see, there is a lot to choose from! Each theme allows you to change skin and eye color and add textures, effects, and some unpleasant facial features like decayed teeth and pockmarks.

For those of us less experienced with photo editing, this is a free and easy way to create some Halloween decorations–just casually replace some of the existing photos in your dorm or apartment with your new Halloween versions and see if anyone notices!

Most of the features are free to use, but some require an upgraded membership. However, you can do a lot with the free version! I experimented on some of our Intern photos:

 

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First up is Tanya Johnson, resident vampire. Seek her out after sundown for help with Excel, but consider wearing a turtleneck.

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Liz Crowder, Wicked Intern of WIC is a great resource for web design and blogging assistance. If you see her stirring a cauldron, though, you may want to reschedule your appointment.

 

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Meaghan Moody, resident representative of the undead, is an expert on accessibility! Make sure to see her outside of mealtimes–she isn’t a picky eater.

 

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Lahari Uppuluri is a Microsoft Office expert. You can find her haunting the booths at WIC during her Monday office hours.

 

 

 

 

As you can see, there are a lot of options for quick-and-easy photo editing with PicMonkey. I have little to no talent in this area and was able to play around until I achieved the desired spooky effect. And remember, we interns are all here and happy to help–don’t be scared to ask! Happy Halloween from the Weigle Information Commons staff!

Announcement: Student Work now featured on ScholarlyCommons New Media Showcase

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Did you know that the Commons celebrates student work online in addition to supporting it here in our study spaces? You may remember reading about Rosie Frasso’s student projects such as Catrice’s post on Fear and Safety and Anu’s post on Pressure Release. These and other success stories are now part of library archives.

To add to the awesome, we are now displaying the results of this research on our New Media Showcase on Penn’s ScholarlyCommons platform. ScholarlyCommons is an open access institutional repository sharing the works of Penn faculty, staff, and students on a local, national, and global level. Here at WIC we were excited to get involved in showcasing some of the student work we see each semeseter–students have created videos, comic books, images, posters, maps, and web projects over the years and WIC staff loves supporting these projects through course interactions, open contests, and however else we can! The New Media Showcase is our next step in continuing this evolution. Learn more by watching this short video by Vickie Karasic to explain our Showcase.

Want to see your work on ScholarlyCommons? Faculty and students can nominate work to be considered in our Showcase! Please fill out this Google Form to submit entries and view our extended permission form.

Head over to the New Media Showcase to check out the research itself.

How Big is Google?

It’s pretty big. A recent article in Wired  highlights how big Google actually is, at least in terms of code. All of Google’s services (Search, Mail, Maps, etc.) encompass 2 billion lines of code stored in one place and shared by 25,000 developers. The graph below illustrates just how big 2 billion lines of code is:

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Microsoft Windows, “one of the most complex software tools ever built for a single computer, a project under development since the 1980s” is significantly smaller than the massiveness of Google.

Although Google’s repository is not open source, it is shared between roughly 25,000 developers who can add and modify code collaboratively. For now Google is an extreme case, but in the future more companies may need to handle gargantuan amounts of code. Facebook and Google are working together on an open source version control system to allow other companies to safely and cleanly house, modify, and create code on a large scale.

Interested in more? Check out the Million Lines of Code graphic for more examples or read the Reddit thread on the topic.

Check out some of our other posts about Google. Interested in learning new tech tools? You can request a training session or check out our monthly WICshop calendar for upcoming events!