5 Ways to Make Your iPhone Battery Last Longer

kelliThis guest post by Kelli Liu, a sophomore from southern California majoring in biology and Apple campus representative, provides some tips for maximizing your iPhone’s battery life.

“Sorry, my phone died.” This short phrase is thrown around all the time—sometimes by us and sometimes to us. While it used to start out as an excuse for not responding to someone, more often than not now, it’s actually true. The transient nature of our battery lives is an increasing issue for phone-reliant college students. Luckily, there are little tricks you can learn to help keep your battery alive a little longer, or sometimes, even a lot. Check these tips out:

1. Turn off Parallax

You may have noticed that when you are at your home screen, your background will move with the tilt of your phone. While this feature is cool for some, it is often dizzying or unnecessary to others. Don’t think you need it? Turn it off through
Settings > General > Accessibility > Reduce Motion > On, and save some battery.

2. Quit Your Apps

Most people know this feature, but if you are iOS7 or iOS8, you can double click the home button to display all the apps open. You can then proceed to “swipe up” any app that you don’t need. People often forget to quit their apps after they are done, so even if you stop using the app, if you don’t close it, it’ll keep running.

A cool new feature of iOS8 is that you can now see what apps are using the most battery under Settings > General > Usage. This helps you know which apps to quit if you need them all or simply want to have your battery last a little longer.

3. Turn Off Location Services

Some apps like maps and weather are necessary for location services, but others really aren’t; they are unnecessarily and unknowingly draining your battery life when you open them. Edit these settings under Settings > Privacy > Location Services.

4. Turn Down Your Brightness

Unless you need your screen to shine like a flashlight, turn down your screen brightness. The level of brightness on your screen may seem like no big deal, but the energy your phone expends to keep everything a little bit brighter would really surprise you. You can also turn on auto-brightness if you want your phone to help when you forget.

5. Turn Off What You Don’t Need

This is like quitting apps, but for settings like WiFi and Bluetooth. When these features are on, they are constantly searching for connectivity and searching drains your battery without you even knowing it.

Recently moved to an iPhone 6 or 6+, or from Android to iPhone? Check out this post for more tips on using iOS 8.

How Do Libraries Create Services in the Electronic Age?

Libraries have been wrestling with an important issue for years: how can we (and should we) provide reserve materials in electronic formats? In print this was never an issue; if students needed to read an article, libraries could put it on reserve and students could copy it for personal study, or, alternatively, a professor could ask a copy shop to create a course pack which students could then purchase. Recently a case came up in court Cambridge U. Press et. al. vs. Patton (aka the “Georgia State Case”) which essentially is wrestling with that fundamental issue of what libraries can and cannot do with electronic reserves. Fundamentally, the answer comes down to one’s interpretation of fair use.

The courts did not exactly solve the problem for libraries (and the case is still ongoing). They have, however, affirmed some important principles to keep in mind:

  • Fair Use has to be done on a case by case basis. There are no broad rules that apply across the board to different kinds of material.
  • The four factors are not a checklist. If you have 3 of them, you may not have a fair use. If you only have one of them, you may have a fair use. It depends on the circumstances and the purpose of the use.
  • Speaking of checklists, the advice provided in various recommendations such as the Classroom Copying Guidelines and other forms of best practices are not legally binding. They can help to think about issues, but will not necessarily help you in court.
  • Library reserves (electronic or print) are not the same as coursepacks. There are certainly similarities, but the legal cases that apply to Kinkos and other companies which sell copies of articles to students do not apply to the services that libraries provide.
  • Most importantly, libraries have to pay attention to the market for reserve material. If libraries potentially affect the publishers’ ability to make money from their products, then it is even more important to look much more thoroughly at the other factors of fair use.

To that last point, there are certain questions that libraries need to consider whenever they assert fair use.

  • Does the use of the material clearly serve the purpose (pedagogical or otherwise) of the course or argument, and, perhaps more importantly, would that purpose be clear to a judge or someone from outside assessing the use?
  • Has the professor, assistant or researcher used whatever they need to make their point, but no more than is needed to make their point? Also, would an outsider (judge or publisher) agree that they used only the amount necessary to make their point?

So, as long as libraries are not causing market harm and they keep in mind those questions, then the courts have supported the rights of fair use. Nevertheless, the questions of how traditional reserve functions fit into an electronic world are still unanswered. More importantly, however, the community needs to decide its interpretation of fair use in certain contexts. Fortunately, the Association of Research Libraries’ Code of Best Practices for Fair Use provides a great deal of help in that regard, and can help individual libraries in assessing these questions.

If you’re interested in learning more, here are some further blog posts from real lawyers about these recent cases:

Conference Takeaway

It isconference kit.png2 our pleasure to announce two new “Conference kits” reservable online for faculty to borrow from the Vitale Digital Media Lab at the Weigle Information Commons. The kits can be borrowed for up to eight days. Each kit contains an Apple Mac-book Air and several video adapters to make it easy to present at a conference (as well as in a classroom).

To reserve, login to WebCheckout with Pennkey, click on “Add Resource”, and look under “Presentation Aids” for the “Laptop Presenter Kits”. Please review our equipment lending guidelines for loan details. WIC provides workshops and tutorials on presentation software such as Prezi and PowerPoint, so let us know how we can help make your next conference presentation the best it can be!

How to be Basic

linkedin photoThis guest post is by Amanda Gisonni, a junior studying Psychology in the College. In this post, she describes various ways to gain basic skill sets in computer software programs by using resources in the Weigle Information Commons. 

This is not what you think it is. I am not here to instruct you on how to dress or how to act “basic.”  But I will tell you how you can gain some basic skills in certain computer software programs; in other words, boost your knowledge when it comes to Excel, PowerPoint, Illustrator, and more. Weigle Information Commons offers a variety of WICshops that demonstrate some introductory topics in a hands-on approach that will help get you started.

seminarroom_800
This is the WIC Seminar Room in which many workshops are held.

WICshops give a brief but thorough introduction to these programs. They are a starting point and meant to introduce you to the essentials of each program. You will start at the beginning, with opening the program, then you will actually get to use the program and finish by learning how to save your work. Also, these workshops are for people of all skill sets! So, if you are not so tech-savvy, these classes are great for you, and they are also great for people who have some knowledge and are looking to gain more.

Some of the ones I have tried and recommend include InDesign, Photoshop Basics, Photoshop Selection Tools, PowerPoint and more. This October and November, Weigle is offering a variety of workshops for students, some of which include:

  • Introduction to Latex: For those looking to create a scientific document, learn what Latex is and the uses for it in this class. Use various documents, page layouts, fonts and images.
  • Introduction to ArcGIS I: This workshop demonstrates the software and data behind creating maps and geographic analyses. There will be simple exercises to introduce the program to beginners.
  • Introduction to Text Mining: This class is for beginners and those who have some prior experience. “Learn the why and the how of text mining, methodology, cautionary tales, and preferred tools.”
This WICshop calendar is comprehensive and easy to use.
This WICshop calendar is comprehensive and easy to use.

But why stop there? If you are too basic for these, then take some advanced classes! I recommend signing up for Advanced Illustrator Techniques and Audio and Video in PowerPoint.

Each month new WICshops are posted; check the website periodically to see if there is a workshop you are particularly interested in. I also suggest attending office hours if you have a specific question or need help with a certain program. Excel Office Hours and Copyright Office Hours are offered each week. Staff in Weigle and the Vitale Digital Media Lab will also help answer any questions you may have!

 

 

Open Access Week – October 20 – 24, 2014

Open Access week is a global event for institutions around the world to discuss the ways open access is changing the worlds of publishing and scholarly communication.

Below is a schedule of events that Penn is hosting next week.  Please feel free to pass along to anyone who is interested.  You can view the full calendar of events and sign up at http://wic.library.upenn.edu/wicshops/calendaroa.html.

These lectures, workshops, and movie screenings are open to the Penn community and all others who wish to learn more about open access.

Monday, October 20

Open Access Images
10:00am-11:00am, Goldstein Electronic Center, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center
Learn to create and adapt open access images using a variety of techniques.

Tuesday, October 21

Lunch Discussion with Joshua Nicholson
12:00pm-1:00pm, Meyerson Conference Room, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center
A skype discussion with Joshua Nicholson,founder of “The Winnower,” an open access online science publishing
platform .

Creative Commons: The License to Share Knowledge
4:00pm-5:00pm, Room 626, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center
Creative Commons (CC): assign Creative Commons licenses to your own work and nd Creative Commons licensed works – images, texts, and other original material – that you can use in your teaching, scholarship, and creative productions.

Wednesday, October 22

The New Wave of Open Access Publishing
12:00pm-1:00pm, Meyerson Conference Room, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center
A conversation about new open access publishing models including Humanities endeavors: Knowledge Unlatched
and The Open Humanities Library and Biology and medicine journal platform PeerJ. Register to receive readings
in advance.

RiP!: A Remix Manifesto Screening
6:00pm-7:30pm, Class of ‘55, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center
Immerse yourself in the energetic, innovative and potentially illegal world of mash-up media with RiP: A Remix
Manifesto (2008 documentary).

Thursday, October 23

The Feedback Loop Between Open Access & Altmetrics
1:00pm-2:00pm, Class of ’54 (3rd Floor), Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center
Mike Showalter of Plum Analytics will describe and demonstrate the capabilities of using altmetrics to create your
own open access feedback loop (1 hour Webinar).

MOOCs & Beyond: An Open House Hosted by the Open Learning Initiative
4:00pm-5:30pm, Room108, ARCH Building, 3601 Locust Walk
Join the Open Learning team to learn more about creating a MOOC and what resources are available on campus.

5 Must-Have Apps for Students

kelliThis guest post by Kelli Liu, a sophomore from southern California majoring in biology and Apple campus representative, provides recommendations on apps. This post reflects Kelli’s personal opinions and should not be construed as an endorsement by Penn Libraries.

With the industry for app development booming, trying to navigate the app market is overwhelming and often times exhausting. While it’s nice to have so many options, it’s easy to settle for an application even if there’s an even better option out there for you, and it’s especially easy to scroll right past an app that could change your life, or at least the way you work.

Here’s a guide to some must-have, top rated apps that are certainly worth the download, and definitely worth the price—free! So check them out, download them, and enjoy the luxuries of this generation’s application boom.

Continue reading

Copyright Myths, Steve Jobs and User Interfaces

There is a common myth that copyright law protects ideas. This is not true; copyright is about protecting expression of an idea, not the idea itself. In fact, the law states “In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied.”

A famous example of someone who believed that he would protect his idea utilizing copyright was Steve Jobs, who learned his lesson the hard way. In the 1980s Jobs copyrighted his idea for the Apple computer’s user interface. Not long afterward, Bill Gates created Windows with a system similar to Jobs’ design. Jobs sued, but the courts found in favor of Gates because “Apple cannot get patent-like protection for the idea of a graphical user interface, or the idea of a desktop metaphor.” Jobs later used patents, trademarks, and other methods to protect Apple products. However, this example demonstrates how everyone can use ideas under copyright law, even when they are similar.

For more information about the Gates vs. Jobs Lawsuit go to:

http://lowendmac.com/2006/the-apple-vs-microsoft-gui-lawsuit/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Computer,_Inc._v._Microsoft_Corp.

https://law.resource.org/pub/us/case/reporter/F3/035/35.F3d.1435.93-16883.93-16869.93-16867.html